Russian T-34 tank clock

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Thread: Russian T-34 tank clock

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    Default Russian T-34 tank clock

    These clocks are fairly easy to find, particularly as it is thought that they are still made by the original factory for the tourist trade. The winding and setting method is rather neat. This one is for sale on another forum...







    Seller's description: "First is a clock from a Soviet T-34 tank. Designed so that there were no parts sticking out to catch on clothing or equipment, the clock is both wound and set by pulling out and turning the bezel. It appears to have a power reserve of around two days when fully wound and works well".

    No mention of whether it was removed from a tank...



    Here's the link to the Wikipedia entry on the T-34 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-34.

    The same seller also has a Slava split-second stopwatch for sale, of the type used in the Russian Space Programme...





    Seller's description: "Second is a Slava split-seconds stopwatch - As used by the Soviet Space Program! A photo of it in action can be seen on Ill-Phill's website, at the bottom of the page here: http://www.netgrafik.ch/russian_space_watches.htm. This has two second hands (red and green), both of which can be stopped independently so that two times can be kept. The dial counts up to 30 seconds, then records a half-minute on the inner hand/totalizer. This comes with the original wooden box, lined with padded green corduroy to keep the stopwatch safe".

    Regards

    Jon'.
    Last edited by StampeSV4; 06-03-2010 at 11:36.

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    Jon, I don't think that's from a T-34. I have one (will have to find it and take some pics) and it's from a T-72. I bought it to put in the Defender, but other life events intervened, aka 15 months in Baghdad. But I'm now back on track to install it.

    The PR on mine is a lot more than 48 hours - more like 10 days IME. The lume is excellent though! They should issue Soviet Army anti-radiation pills (which were just aspirin) with them
    Cheers all, Colin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nalu View Post
    The PR on mine is a lot more than 48 hours - more like 10 days IME. The lume is excellent though! They should issue Soviet Army anti-radiation pills (which were just aspirin) with them
    It reads ´5 days´ o the dial and that is what it is.
    Indeed from a tank though not from the T34.
    Two other of the more common clocks come from an armoured vehicle and the com-set from the T34. The latter has the ruggedised 1MWF movement.

    Can you substantiate your remark on radiation? Have you held a Geiger counter near it, or had this checked?
    If not, please do not restart an unfounded bogus on the lume paint.
    The fácts are:
    1. the soviets stopped using radium paint before the west did; even defence application was switched to tritium paint
    2. in the US radium paint was used well after the harmfull aspects of it were known; please read about the radium girls

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    I was doubtful that it actually came from a T-34, partly due to its condition, hence the oblique reference to tourists. I assume that it was made by the original factory though. It was described by the seller as being from a T-34 and I've added that first line of his description to the first post above. Great looking clock and that bezel mechanism really appeals.

    The photo of a T-72 below looks like it was taken on a Red Square Parade...



    Here's a few more photos of the parade, although these are T-90s which probably still used the same clocks...







    I suppose it is rather like Smiths aircraft clocks, where every seller says his comes from a Spitfire? The T-34 must be the most famous Russian tank.

    Brilliant idea to put one in a Defender - I was thinking about replacing the OEM clock with a rev counter and the tank clock would be a better option than relocating the OEM quartz clock. Thanks for that idea, Colin!

    I've just had a look in Konrad's book on German military timepieces and he suggests that five different models have been identified, as used in tanks, radio trucks and armoured cars. Some have a winding key which you insert at 6 o'clock. There is also another type based on a 1930s Le Coultre clock. NVA radio cars had two versions of that one installed - in combat one was set to Moscow time, the other to local time. Konrad says that these 57128 cal clocks were produced by the Czelyabinsk (Molnija) factory. Interestingly, he also states that versions were used in the MI-8 helicopter and AN-26 aircraft...

    Here's the MI-8 cockpit, good luck identifying the clock...





    Here's the AN-26...





    Petrus - I had understood that the Soviets stopped using Radium back in the early '60s - you don't know when exactly do you, by any chance? It would be useful / interesting to know.

    Regards

    Jon'.
    Last edited by StampeSV4; 06-03-2010 at 12:53.

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    Default Radium and soviets

    Radium paint was pretty expensive so it was very sparsely used by wristwatch factories.
    It was mainly reserved for watches with military application.
    When watchmaking took off on a serious scale in the sixties radium paint was not used.

    For purely military applications such as board instruments I have no data save for the radio clocks offered on ebay. Sofar only dials on clocks with movements with production dates pré sixties have radium.
    Same story the vodolaz die wtach. It seems that pre-sixties painted dials were radium painted. When those dials were assembled is another aspect. That is a diffence between the vast output of weapons systems and the limited batch producttion of the dive tools.

    I suppose a watch like the Gagarin replica http://www.netgrafik.ch/images/gagarin-sturmanskie.jpg would give the most representative answer for wristwatches.
    It was continuously produced in an endless stream of replicas of replicas in the same basic design by the same manufacturor that also was typical.
    I am however not an expert on this model. I know how to recognise an original and have a late though soviet homage with an alarm movement (for that reason) myself. That is it.
    Find the cutoff production quarter of radium in the Gagarin replica and you will have a pretty clearcut answer.

    Mine, flanked by ´Jessica´ and the vodolaz: http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Foto-JY8JUBCG.jpg

    Maybe I should add the horizon. The soviets will no doubt have had probably had two sources for radium paint manufacturing under one controling body.
    The application or not will have been binairy. Same thing the switch to tritium-paint. Most likely the sources switched thus ALL dials....
    Last edited by StampeSV4; 06-03-2010 at 12:55. Reason: additional info

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    Thanks, Petrus. I've just added some more information and photos to my earlier post.

    Regards

    Jon'.

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    Here's one of the versions with the winding key, as mentioned above...











    Case diameter is stated as 64mm. Currently for sale on ebay. Personally, I prefer the winding bezel version.

    Regards

    Jon'.

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    I have a few Russian clocks too.

    129YC 55M

    95mm diameter
    100mm thick
    Luminous hands and dial





    127-CHS
    65mm diameter
    50mm thick
    Luminous hands and dial





    CHP-60
    95mm diameter
    65mm thick
    Non-luminous hands and dial


    - Jie Hong
    Blog - http://jiehong.org/blog
    Watch Gallery - http://jiehong.net/gallery/v/jiehong/Watches/ (Small & humble collection)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huertecilla View Post
    Can you substantiate your remark on radiation? Have you held a Geiger counter near it, or had this checked?
    If not, please do not restart an unfounded bogus on the lume paint.
    The fácts are:
    1. the soviets stopped using radium paint before the west did; even defence application was switched to tritium paint
    2. in the US radium paint was used well after the harmfull aspects of it were known; please read about the radium girls
    I'm not starting rumors - my remark was a joke, as indicated by the emoticon/smilie. I'll keep my own reading schedule, thanks - I read more than enough nuclear physics and engineering when I was in university
    Cheers all, Colin

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    As for my tank clock, it came with the mounting bracket and from looking at the back seems to have had it's connections severed, so I'm assuming it came from a tank. And the last time I checked the PR it was over a week, outlasting my Mi-2 clock. My Mi-17 clock is broken (my own stupidity), so I don't know its PR.
    Cheers all, Colin

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